Understanding Cryptocurrency’s Tax Effects

Crypto traders and enthusiasts may have severe tax problems on their minds given the startling increase in the value of various cryptocurrencies. Even individuals who keep the money, much less those who trade it, must be careful not to break the law in light of the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) increased enforcement operations.

 Considering how the IRS views cryptocurrencies, it could be simpler to accomplish than you imagine. The two main reasons the IRS is concerned about cryptocurrencies are that it is taxable to trade cryptocurrencies and because exchanging real money for digital ones is a method of money laundering.

The IRS issued advice on the reporting and taxes requirements for the sale, acquisition, and transfer of cryptocurrencies as a consequence of this attention, although there are still some murky areas.

1.      You’ll be questioned about whether you used or held cryptocurrencies

You must declare if you’ve engaged in bitcoin transactions on your 2021 tax return. The question “At any point during 2021, did you receive, sell, transmit, swap or otherwise acquire any financial interest” is prominently displayed near the top of Form 1040.

This puts you in a situation where you may potentially lie to the IRS by having to answer categorically whether you have engaged in bitcoin trading. If you lie or cheat against cryptocurrency tax laws in Australia, you face the danger of getting into more legal issues if you don’t answer honestly.

However, a footnote is included. In a recent clarification, the IRS stated that taxpayers who exclusively used real money to buy virtual currency were exempt from the requirement to select “yes.”

2.      You don’t escape being taxed just because you didn’t get a 1099

You (and the IRS) will ordinarily receive a Form 1099 from a bank or brokerage disclosing the income you’ve earned over the course of the year. Cryptocurrency, though, might not be like that.

“Compared to normal 1099 forms for stocks, interest, and other payments, there isn’t really the same degree of reporting for cryptocurrencies now,” “The IRS doesn’t get great data from Coinbase and other exchanges.”

A legislation passed in November 2021 would, however, mandate more extensive tax reporting for anyone working in the sector beginning on January 1, 2023.

 Brokers are required by law to submit this information to the IRS on a 1099 or comparable form, including, controversially, anybody who trades digital assets on behalf of another.

Opponents claim that the bill will compel everyone that transfers bitcoin, such as miners and crypto wallets, to abide by the new regulations, even if they don’t have access to such information. To more precisely specify who the legislation applies to, MPs are already drafting a new measure.

You still need to declare your profits and pay tax on them; the absence of a 1099 won’t absolve you of any tax obligations.

Wrapping it up

Utilizing cryptocurrency may be quite difficult, as it requires keeping track of your cost basis, recording your effective realized price, and sometimes paying taxes as well (even without an official Form 1099 statement).

Additionally, by thoroughly examining who is exchanging cryptocurrency, the IRS is tightening up enforcement and monitoring against suspected tax avoidance. All of these elements contribute to the difficulty of using cryptocurrencies and may hinder their further adoption.